The #1 Secret to Successful Vegie Gardening

Robyn Francis shares tips in this FREE PDF Autumn Planting Guide to create a productive garden to eat through the pandemic lock down

Apart from good soil, compost and sufficient sunlight, the most important thing to ensure a successful, productive vegie garden is to plant what likes to grow in each season.  Planting things at the wrong time of year is a recipe for disappointment.

With so many people rushing to get a garden growing to Pandemic-proof their lives, I’ve prepared this planting guide for what to start growing right now, in Autumn (March to late May) here in the southern hemisphere subtropics. This climate zone is found along the Australian east coast from the NSW Mid-North Coast (Taree) up to the QLD Sunshine Coast, and in the Atherton Tablelands in FNQ. It is also useful for Subtropical parts of Brazil and Southern Africa.

In the subtropics, our winter climate is similar to a temperate summer (just the days are shorter and nights a little cooler), so you wont be surprised to find it’s the best time of year to grow the classic European and temperate vegetables here in the subtropics, and your temperate friends in Northern Europe and Nth America will be spring planting much the same things right now and over the coming months.

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Planning Ahead
The gardener is always planning ahead. To avoid long ‘famine’ periods between seasons it’s critical to always get the next season’s crops in at the right time. To help you plan a year-round supply of food from the garden I’ve prepare this Garden Chart, based on the Eightfold Year seasons for the Southern Hemisphere. There’s a Subtropical version and also a Temperate one for those on the NSW Tablelands and basically from Newcastle to Melbourne. Check it out HERE

2 thoughts on “The #1 Secret to Successful Vegie Gardening

  1. martynfox1 says:

    Hi Robyn, thank you for doing such a lovely planting handout! Can you let me know when the download is available? The link indicates that there isn’t one yet. Warm regards, Marty Fox

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